Confirmed Speakers


Gale Burford

Bruce P. Archibald

Bruce is a native Nova Scotian who has been a professor at the Dalhousie University Schulich School of Law in Halifax since 1976. His teaching subject areas have included criminal law and procedure, evidence, comparative law, and labour and employment law. His current research interests include restorative justice, labour and employment law, and integrated labour market regulation. He has served as a consultant to the Law Reform Commission of Canada, the Federal and Nova Scotia Departments of Justice, and the Royal Commission of Inquiry on the Donald Marshall Jr. Prosecution. Bruce was a founding member of the Nova Scotia Department of Justice Restorative Justice Steering Committee in 1997, and continued as a member of the NSRJ Management Committee. Bruce has also acted as a labour arbitrator and mediator in both the public and private sectors since 1984, doing both grievance and interest arbitrations.


Tod Augusta-Scott

Tod Augusta-Scott

Tod Augusta-Scott, MSW is known internationally for his work with domestic violence, restorative approaches and narrative therapy. He has worked in a trauma-informed community-based organization for twenty years. Over the last fifteen years he has published and presented his work internationally (Asia, Europe, British Isles, America) and presented in every province in Canada. He works with the Canadian Armed Forces. He has also taught in the Department of Social Work, Dalhousie University and is a guest speaker in classes on a regular basis. Tod is also on faculty at the Windz Institute in Toronto. He is the co-editor and contributor to the critically acclaimed book Narrative Therapy: Making Meaning, Making Lives (Sage Publications, 2007). He has created a group manual for working with men who have abused that has been officially adopted by government departments in New Brunswick, Newfoundland and the Northwest Territories. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Award from the Canadian Association of Social Workers in 2013. Tod is currently working on a documentary on domestic violence and restorative justice entitled A Better Man.


Gale Burford

Gale Burford

Gale Burford is Emeritus Professor at the University of Vermont. Until his retirement in 2014, he was Director of the University-State Child Welfare Training Partnership and Principal Investigator for the Community Justice Consortium. Professor Burford has held full-time appointments in Social Work at Memorial University of Newfoundland and the University of Vermont, and has held visiting appointments at the University of Stirling in Scotland and Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. He has published extensively on a wide range research activities, including those that focus restorative justice and family engagement interventions -- particularly in situations of child abuse and interpersonal violence, the use of drug courts, reparative probation with adult offenders, a youth-run community living program, group care and residential treatment programs, differential treatment approaches, teamwork, and organizational change. His current writing focuses on results garnered from a multi-year, multiple-methods study of one US state’s efforts to incorporate participatory and restorative practices into its child welfare and youth justice services. He advises and supports a number of projects and programs and provides training and evaluation for programs that employ partnership approaches to their work, such as the Leeds, UK, evaluation of the use of family group conferences and other restorative practices, and serves on the advisory board for the On The Move Partnership, a project of the SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health & Safety Research based at Memorial University. He is a member of a team supporting the development of the Restorative Approach to Peaceful and Sustainable Societies Alliance (RAPSSA) initiated by colleagues at Dalhousie University. His career in Social Work began in 1968 in the State of Washington where he also completed undergraduate (St. Martin’s University) and graduate degrees (MSW University of Washington), shifted to a decade of work in Québec before moving to Newfoundland & Labrador. His doctorate is from Stirling. Professor Burford’s professional life has revolved around practice, regular study, teaching and research in international venues but particularly in Northern England and New Zealand. He has a long history of experience as a foster and group home parent, caseworker and social work practitioner, trainer, and supervisor, manager and senior administrator in services for children, young people and their families.


Gale Burford

Donna Coker

Donna is a Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law. Her scholarship focuses on criminal law, gender, and inequality. Her research concerns Restorative Justice; the connection between economic vulnerability and domestic violence; and gender and criminal law doctrine. Her empirical study of domestic violence cases in Navajo Peacemaking Courts has influenced work in the fields of Restorative Justice and domestic violence. Her current research regards the use of RJ for campus sexual assault. She is a member of Campus PRISM. Donna co-chaired the 2014 national conference, Converge! Reimagining the Movement to End Gender Violence; co-investigated the 2015 US survey, Responses from the Field: Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, and Policing; and co-created Reimagining the Movement to End Gender Violence available at mediaforchange.org/reimagine.


Gale Burford

Karen Crombie

Following her B.A. (Hons) in 1984 from the University of Calgary, Karen graduated from University of Toronto Law School in 1988, and was called to the bar in Ontario in 1990 and in Nova Scotia in 1995.After conducting a commercial litigation practice for a number of years initially in Toronto (McDonald & Hayden) and then Halifax (Green Parish), Karen had a brief appointment as an Appeal Commissioner on the Nova Scotia Workers’ Compensation Appeals Tribunal before joining Dalhousie University in 2000 as Associate Legal Counsel. She was appointed as University Legal Counsel in 2003. Her title changed to General Counsel in 2013, and she presently leads a team of six lawyers providing in-house advice to Dalhousie University.


Fania Davis

Fania Davis

Fania Davis, RJOY’s Executive Director, is an African-American woman, long-time social justice activist, a restorative justice scholar and professor, and a civil rights attorney with a Ph.D. in indigenous knowledge. Coming of age in Birmingham, Alabama during the social ferment of the civil rights era, the murder of two close childhood friends in the 1963 Sunday School bombing crystallized within Fania a passionate commitment to social transformation. For the next decades, she was active in the civil rights, Black liberation, women’s, prisoners’, peace, socialist, anti-imperialist, anti-racial violence and anti-apartheid movements. After receiving her law degree from University of California, Berkeley in 1979, Fania practiced almost 27 years as a civil rights trial lawyer. During the late 1990’s, she entered a Ph.D. program in indigenous studies at the California Institute of Integral Studies, and apprenticed with traditional healers around the globe, particularly in Africa. Fania has since taught Restorative Justice at San Francisco ‘s New College Law School and Indigenous Peacemaking at Eastern Mennonite University‘s Center for Justice and Peacebuilding. Founding Director of RJOY, Fania also serves as counsel to the International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers. Honors include the Ubuntu Service to Humanity award, the Maloney award recognizing exceptional contributions in youth-based restorative justice, and World Trust's Healing Justice award. She was recently named by the Los Angeles Times as a new Civil Rights Leader of the 21st century. Fania is also a mother, grandmother, dancer, and practitioner of yoga and qigong.


Gale Burford

Amanda Demsey

Amanda graduated from the Dalhousie Faculty of Dentistry in 2015. Originally from Kitchener, Ontario, she moved to the east coast to pursue an undergraduate education at Dalhousie University in Microbiology & Immunology before being accepted to the dental program. She has practiced dentistry in St. John’s, NL and now practices in Halifax. Amanda became involved in restorative justice during her final year of dental school and worked closely with Melissa MacKay, Jacob McIsaac and Jennifer Llewellyn. She has spoken on the topic of restorative justice alongside Dr. Jillian Doiron at the annual Dalhousie Women’s Alumni Association luncheon and together they have an article published with Professor Llewellyn in the fall 2015 issue of Our Schools, Our Selves.


Gale Burford

Richard Derible

Richard is a School Administration Supervisor with the Halifax Regional School Board (HRSB). Previously Richard was on secondment with the Department of Justice and led the restorative approach in Schools Project, a joint project of the Department of Justice and the Department of Education that supported the adoption of a restorative approach in over 100 public schools in Nova Scotia. Before joining the HRSB, he worked for the Special Projects Division of the Department of Community Services and developed outdoor programs for children with special needs and at-risk youth. Richard led the adoption of a restorative approach at St. Catherine’s School in Halifax, Nova Scotia’s first Restorative Elementary School, and co-teaches the Restorative Approach in the Classroom course at Mount St. Vincent University.


Moana Eruera

Moana Eruera

PhD (Indigenous Studies), M. Phil (Social Work), Post Grad Dip (Social Policy & Social Work), B.A (Māori), Registered Social Worker NZ, MANZASW, Tangata Whenua Social Worker Association (TWASWA).

Moana has more than 25 years experience in social and community work including; whānau violence prevention, child protection, indigenous training and framework development, youth restorative justice, Tribal projects and research. Her working career and vision has been spent committed to child safety and wellbeing, social work and social justice, human rights and the development of Māori and indigenous people. She currently shares the New Zealand National Principal Advisor Maori role with Dr Leland Ruwhiu in the Office of the Chief Social Worker. She has published a range of articles and reports on indigenous social work and research including her PhD working with indigenous youth in her own tribal area examining their intimate partner relationships and violence.

She is of Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Ruanui and Ngāti Rangiwewehi tribal descent. Eldest of 3 sisters, Mother of 2 boys (and many other family members she cares for) and active member of her extended family and tribe.


Gale Burford

Gail Gatchalian

Gail has practiced employment, labour, administrative and human rights law since 1998. She has particular experience in the education sector, regularly advising and representing teacher unions. Gail is a Nova Scotia Human Rights Board of Inquiry Chair, and provides workplace investigation and mediation services. She completed Basic and Advanced Transformative Mediation training with the Institute for the Study of Conflict Transformation in 2015. Gail is the Vice-Chair of the Canadian Bar Association National Labour & Employment Law Section, Chair of the CBA-Nova Scotia Equity Committee, and Board Member of the Canadian Association for the Practical Study of Law in Education.


Leigh Goodmark

Leigh Goodmark

Leigh Goodmark is a Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Frances King Carey School of Law. Professor Goodmark directs the Gender Violence Clinic, a clinic providing direct representation in matters involving intimate partner abuse, sexual assault, trafficking, and other cases involving gender violence. Professor Goodmark’s scholarship focuses on domestic violence. She is the co-editor of Comparative Perspectives on Gender Violence: Lessons from Efforts Worldwide (Oxford 2015) and the author of A Troubled Marriage: Domestic Violence and the Legal System (New York University 2012), which was named a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title of 2012. Her work on domestic violence has appeared in numerous journals, law reviews, and publications, including Violence Against Women, the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, the Yale Journal on Law and Feminism, and Fusion.net. From 2003 to 2014, Professor Goodmark was on the faculty at the University of Baltimore School of Law, where she served as Director of Clinical Education and Co-director of the Center on Applied Feminism. From 2000 to 2003, Professor Goodmark was the Director of the Children and Domestic Violence Project at the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law. Before joining the Center on Children and the Law, Professor Goodmark represented battered women and children in the District of Columbia in custody, visitation, child support, restraining order, and other civil matters. Professor Goodmark is a graduate of Yale University and Stanford Law School.


Mary Ivec

Danny Graham

Danny Graham is a former defence lawyer, government advisor and political leader. He was the Chief Negotiator for the Province of Nova Scotia in comprehensive aboriginal rights negotiations. In the 1990s he led the initiative to establish the Nova Scotia Restorative Justice Program. He was later a special advisor to the federal government on matters of youth justice, restorative justice and anti-terrorism. He has worked on matters of criminal justice reform with United Nations and the governments of Thailand, Jamaica and Ukraine. He is a past Member of the Nova Scotia Legislature and Leader of the Nova Scotia Liberal Party. He is currently a member of the Smart Justice Network - a group of former senior justice officials who are exploring ways for Canadians to re-imagine a criminal justice system that better addresses the harm done to victims; that better reduces the risk of crime; and that builds healthier communities. He is the Chief Engagement Officer for Engage Nova Scotia and a Special Advisor to the law firm, McInnes Cooper.


Gale Burford

Emma Halpern

Emma is the Officer of Access and Equity for the Nova Scotia Barristers Society where she provides programming and advice on all matters pertaining to access to justice and equity in the legal profession in Nova Scotia. Recently, Emma has begun working with the professional responsibility department to conceptualize a proactive, restorative approach to legal regulation. This work includes taking a restorative approach to address challenges related to access to justice and to culture and climate within the legal profession. Emma has also been a consultant on the provincial government restorative approaches in schools initiative since 2008 and has conducted extensive research and project development around building a restorative approach to working with children and youth. She is also a regional advocate for the Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies.


Mary Ivec

Mary Ivec

Mary Ivec is a researcher at the Regulatory Institutions Network (RegNet) at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. She holds postgraduate degrees in social policy, social work and counselling. Mary has close to thirty years experience in human services ranging from the not-for-profit sector, government policy development, social work education and clinical practice as a mental health social worker. Mary began her research work at RegNet with Valerie Braithwaite in 2007 working on the Capacity Building in Child Protection project focusing on Aboriginal parents’ experiences of contemporary child protection interventions and systems. Mary has since worked on Val’s Regulation and Social Capital project and with Liz Bluff’s National Research Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Regulation. Mary is now working with the Australian Intervention Support Hub, a partnership between ANU and Deakin University in Melbourne, bringing together national and international expertise, knowledge and experience in the prevention and reversal of radicalisation. Mary is also actively involved in the community initiative of Canberra becoming a Restorative Community. Mary’s long term work has been in the areas of community development, cross-cultural mental health and trauma counselling, especially with refugee communities.


David Karp

David Karp

David Karp is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Project on Restorative Justice at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York. His scholarship focuses on restorative justice in community and campus settings and on prison programs preparing inmates for return to the community. He was the recipient of the 2010 Donald D. Gehring Award from the Association for Student Conduct Administration for his work on campus restorative justice. David has published more than 100 academic papers and six books, including The Little Book of Restorative Justice for Colleges and Universities (2013), Wounds That Do Not Bind: Victim-Based Perspectives on the Death Penalty (2006), and The Community Justice Ideal (1999). David is on the Advisory Council for the National Association for Community and Restorative Justice. He has previously served as Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Chair of the Department of Sociology, and Director of the Program in Law and Society. He is also a volunteer mediator and a restorative justice facilitator and trainer. David received a B.A. in Peace and Conflict Studies from the University of California at Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Washington.


Mimi Kim

Mimi Kim

Mimi Kim is a long-time advocate and activist working on issues of domestic violence and sexual assault especially in immigrant communities of color. She is a co-founder of Incite! Women and Trans People of Color Against Violence and the founder of Creative Interventions (CI), a resource center committed to the creation and promotion of alternative community-based interventions to interpersonal violence. She is currently working on a California statewide capacity building project to implement the CI model and other Transformative Justice-related interventions. Mimi is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at California State University Long Beach.


Hugh Kirkegaard

Hugh Kirkegaard

Hugh is Regional Chaplain for the Atlantic Region of the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC). Previously he served as Regional Chaplain for Ontario and Nunavut for eight years and as the National Chaplaincy Co-ordinator for Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA) for released offenders. When he served as Community Chaplain in Toronto he was actively involved with the founding of CoSA.

An ordained Baptist minister, Hugh is affiliated with First Baptist Church Halifax. He has been involved in correctional chaplaincy since 1978, where he became acquainted with restorative justice through the victim offender mediation lens. He served as a prison chaplain in Dorchester, Springhill, Atlantic and Westmorland Institutions and as University Chaplain at Mount Allison. Educated at Mount Allison, Regent College (UBC), and Acadia Divinity College, Hugh also taught in the Restorative Justice Program at Queen’s Theological College in Kingston, Ontario and in Durban, South Africa.


Jennifer Llewellyn

Jennifer Llewellyn

Jennifer Llewellyn is the Viscount Bennett Professor of Law at the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University. Her teaching and research is focused in the areas of relational theory, restorative justice, truth commissions, international and domestic human rights law and Canadian constitutional law. She has written and published extensively on the theory and practice of a restorative approach in both transitional contexts and established democracies. Jennifer was the Director of the Nova Scotia Restorative Justice Community University Research Alliance (NSRJ-CURA) a collaborative research partnership between university and community partners focused on the institutionalization of restorative justice. She has worked extensively in the field internationally including with the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the Jamaican government, the government of New Zealand and the United Nations. She co-edited two books in the area: Being Relational: Reflections on Relational Theory and Health Law (UBC Press) and Restorative Justice, Reconciliation and Peacebuilding (Oxford University Press).

She advises and supports a number of projects and programs using a restorative approach in Nova Scotia and internationally. For example, she is an academic/policy advisor to the Nova Scotia Restorative Justice Program, the Provincial Restorative Approaches in Schools Project, the HASA Network developing a restorative approach to senior safety and the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission. She recently facilitated the design process for a restorative public inquiry into the Home for Colored Children and previously advised on the Assembly of First Nations and Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission on the response to Residential School abuse. This past year she advised and co-facilitated the restorative process at the Faculty of Dentistry at Dalhousie University. She also recently conducted a comprehensive review of the Northwest Territories Human Rights Commission. She presented her work at the World Summit of Nobel Laureates in Warsaw, Poland in 2014. In November 2015 she received the National Ron Wiebe Restorative Justice Award from Corrections Canada.


Dr. Kristina R. Llewellyn

Kristina Llewellyn

Dr. Kristina R. Llewellyn is Associate Professor of Social Development Studies at Renison University College, University of Waterloo. She is also an associate member of the Department of Sociology and Legal Studies, as well as the Women’s Studies Program at the University of Waterloo. Llewellyn researches and teaches about citizenship and equity from a socio-historical perspective.

She is the author of Democracy’s Angels: The Work of Women Teachers (MQUP, 2012), which is the first-ever examination of the limits of educational democracy for women educators in the history of Canadian schooling. The Canadian Oral History Reader (MQUP, 2015), which she co-edited, is the first primer on oral history scholarship ever produced in Canada. Her forthcoming collection from Palgrave Macmillan is Oral History and Education: Theories, Dilemmas, and Practices. Llewellyn is also the author of dozens of peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and conference papers, including "A Restorative Approach to Learning: Relational Theory as Feminist Pedagogy in Universities," (co-authored with Jennifer Llewellyn), in Penny Light et al. (eds.) Feminist Pedagogy in Higher Education (WLU, 2015).

Llewellyn is currently involved in several projects that address a restorative approach to historical harms through oral history and reconciliation pedagogy. She was recently part of a panel for the BBC World Service’s The Forum that addressed history education for reconciliation. Llewellyn has been awarded the Marion Dewar Prize, UBC’s Education 100, CACS Outstanding Publication in Curriculum Studies, and numerous SSHRC grants. She is currently the President of the Canadian History of Education Association.


Estelle Macdonald

Estelle Macdonald

Estelle Macdonald is a National Leader of Education. She is CEO of Hull Collaborative Teaching School, which has been running for 3 years and is one of the biggest alliances in the country. Estelle became CEO of Hull Collaborative Academy Trust when it formed in July 2013. Estelle has extensive experience in school to school support and she has done some significant work for the National College of School Leadership, coordinating school to school support for the Yorkshire Region. She is also on the Hull School Standards board, helping to raise standards and build strong and effective relationships within schools across the County. Estelle took her own school from special measures to outstanding and Collingwood has been designated a National support school, a Teaching school and now an accredited SCITT.

Estelle also Heads up Hull Centre for Restorative Practice. Her school is a lead school for Restorative Practice and she is regularly invited to speak both nationally and internationally at conferences, on this subject.


Gale Burford

Jacob MacIsaac

Jake is Community Safety Officer with Dalhousie University Security Services, and focuses on promoting restorative approaches within campus security and with other campus stakeholders. Previously, Jake spent over five years as the Lead Caseworker at Nova Scotia’s largest restorative justice agency,overseeing case work staff and managing 700+ youth justice referrals from police, the prosecution service and the courts annually. Jake was part of a three person facilitation team overseeing the restorative justice process at Dalhousie’s Faculty of Dentistry in 2015 addressing climate and culture within the faculty. This effort was most publicly recognized in May 2015 when the "Report from the Restorative Justice Process at the Dalhousie University Faculty of Dentistry" was published of which Melissa MacKay and Jake were co-authors.


Gale Burford

Melissa MacKay

Melissa is Associate Director of Student Life at Dalhousie University, and has extensive experience working in higher education administration, specializing in developing education and support on issues of gender, sexualized violence and consent, as well as conflict resolution and restorative processes and approaches. Melissa was part of a three person facilitation team overseeing the restorative justice process at Dalhousie’s Faculty of Dentistry in 2015 addressing climate and culture within the faculty. This effort was most publicly recognized in May 2015 when the "Report from the Restorative Justice Process at the Dalhousie University Faculty of Dentistry" was published of which Jake MacIsaac and Melissa were co-authors.


Chris Marshall

Chris Marshall

Professor Chris Marshall is the inaugural holder of the Chair in Restorative Justice in the School of Government, at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. Prior to taking up this post in 2014, he was the Head of the School of Art History, Classics and Religious Studies at Victoria. He is author of six books and more than a hundred articles, book chapters and reference work entries, and has won several awards, including two for excellence in tertiary teaching and two international awards for contributions to restorative justice. He is also a trained and experienced restorative justice facilitator and in 2004 received the International Community Justice Award from the Home Office in Britain. The Chair in Restorative Justice is sponsored by the Ministry of Justice, the Department of Corrections, the NZ Police, the Ministry of Social Development, the Ministry of Education, the NZ Defence Force, the Accident Compensation Corporation, as well as by one private trust.


Gale Burford

Debora Matthews

Debora is Professor in the Department of Dental Clinical Sciences, Director of Graduate Periodontics, Assistant Dean of Research and incoming Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs for the Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University. She is Past-President of the Canadian Association of Dental Research, and Director of the Network for Canadian Oral Health Research – both of which provide her with research networking potential crucial to advancing collaborative oral health research in Canada. She has been educating undergraduate and graduate dentists for over 20 years. As chair of the Faculty’s "Next Steps" committee, she has been working with staff and faculty as we move beyond the recent social media crisis to address recommendations from the 2015 report on the Restorative Justice process at Dalhousie University’s Faculty of Dentistry.


Gale Burford

Mary McNally

Mary is an academic in the faculties of Dentistry and Medicine at Dalhousie University. Her teaching and research interests include health care and research ethics focusing on social justice and access to care for vulnerable populations where she uses interdisciplinary and community-based approaches to promote health and address health inequity. She contributes a great deal to academic/service work in ethics and professionalism currently as: Chair of the Faculty of Dentistry DDS4 Academic Standards Class Committee (determining performance and promotion); coordinator for Faculty of Dentistry ethics/law curriculum; a member of the Faculty of Medicine Professionalism Committee; and longstanding member of the Dalhousie Health Sciences Research Ethics Board. She is the first Canadian recipient of the American Dental Education Association Enid A. Neidle Scholar-in- Residence (2016) award to promote the advancement of women in dental education.


Kate Morris

Kate Morris

Dr. Kate Morris is a Professor of Social Work at The University of Sheffield. She is a qualified registered social worker, and joined the University of Sheffield in 2015. She was previously Director of the Centre for Social Work and Deputy Head of School, University of Nottingham. She began her career as an academic at the University of Birmingham. However, Kate gained substantial experience in practice, management and policy development prior to moving into social work education and through her research and her involvement in national and international social work developments has remained very closely connected to practice. Kate’s areas of interest are: family minded policy and practice, family participation in care and protection, the reform of safeguarding practice and child welfare inequalities. She is passionate about social work and the role of social work in supporting change.


Brenda Morrison

Brenda Morrison

Brenda Morrison is the Director of the Centre for Restorative Justice and an Associate Professor in the School of Criminology, Simon Fraser University. She is a social psychologist with field experience in outdoor education, government administration and restorative justice. Her teaching and research interests include transformative and restorative justice, responsive regulation, school violence and safety, conflict and cooperation, shame-management and social identity, the self and self-interest.

She is a member of a number of editorial boards, including the recently launched Restorative Justice: An International Journal.

Nationally, she is a research partner with PREVNet (Promoting Relationships Eliminating Violence Network) and a reconciliation ambassador for Reconciliation Canada and serves on the Board of Smart Justice Canada.

In British Columbia, she has served on the Ministry of Justice Performance Review Committee and the working group for a Justice System for the 21st Century. She serves on the advisory committee for BC Victims of Homicide.

She is an active board member for the North Shore Restorative Justice Society and an associate board member of Vancouver Association for Restorative Justice.


Paul Nixon

Paul Nixon

Paul Nixon is Chief Social Worker for Child, Youth and Family, Ministry of Social Development in New Zealand. Paul is originally from the UK and has worked for more than 25 years in Child Protection and Youth Justice, always in a statutory setting. Paul was inspired by practice and innovations from New Zealand, particularly Family Group Conferences, Restorative Justice and Whanau / Kinship Care. Previously Paul was Assistant Director (Social Care) for North Yorkshire County Council and he also worked as Strategic Lead for Restorative Practices for Hull City Council. Paul has written a number of books on social work, empowerment and work with children and families, and numerous articles and chapters. He has provided consultancy, research and evaluation and training on work with children and families around the world.


Dr. Joan Pennell

Joan Pennell

Dr. Joan Pennell received her AB from Earlham College in Indiana, her MSW from Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, and her PhD from Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania. She is the Founding Director of the Center for Family and Community Engagement and Professor of Social Work at North Carolina State University. Her center has received funding for work on family-centered practice and family engagement (NC Division of Social Services, NC Department of Public Instruction), foster youth and educational success (US Administration for Children and Families), and fathering in the context of domestic violence (NC Division of Social Services, NC Council of Women). She serves as researcher for the NC Community Child Protection Teams Advisory Board. Community Child Protection Teams are citizen review panels for improving public child welfare in North Carolina. Before her return to the United States, she was a principal investigator (with Dr. Gale Burford) for a Newfoundland & Labrador, Canada, demonstration of family group conferencing in situations of child maltreatment and domestic violence. Three diverse sites--Inuit, rural, and urban—hosted the demonstration project. She was appointed to the National Crime Prevention Council (Canada), chaired its Youth Justice Committee, and promoted social development strategies for crime prevention. She helped to found the first shelter for abused women and their children in Newfoundland and co-facilitated support groups for abused women of European and Aboriginal descent.

In affiliation with the American Humane, she served as an external evaluator of Family Team Meetings for the District of Columbia Child & Family Services Agency, and she was a member of an international team reviewing the family group conferencing program in New Zealand. She served on the International Advisory Group for the restorative justice process at Dalhousie University. She serves on the Advisory Group for the Campus PRISM (Promoting Restorative Initiatives for Sexual Misconduct on College Campuses) and the Advisory Group for the Evaluation of the Family Group Conference Service in Leeds, United Kingdom.

he co-authored Community Research as Empowerment: Feminist Links, Postmodern Interruptions (Oxford University Press),Widening the Circle: The Practice and Evaluation of Family Group Conferencing with Children, Youths, and Their Families (NASW Press), Family Group Conferencing: Evaluation Guidelines (American Humane Association), and Safety, Fairness, Stability: Repositioning Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare to Engage Families and Communities (Georgetown University Center for Juvenile Justice Reform). She has over 200 publications. She has presented on family engagement across Canada and the United States as well as in Australia, Guatemala, Israel, Netherlands, New Zealand, and United Kingdom. Her editorial work includes the Review Board of Child Welfare, the International Advisory Board of the Restorative Justice: An International Journal, and the editorial board of Contemporary Justice Review.

In 2014, she was inducted into the Academy of Community Engagement Scholarship, a national organization to recognize and advance community-university collaborations to promote the public good.


Gale Burford

Kevin Reade

Kevin is in his 26th year with the HRM Fire Service at the rank of Captain, and the current president of the Halifax Association of Black Firefighters. He became a diversity educator after attending the National Multicultural Institute. In his native Halifax, he designed and delivered dynamic cultural awareness training sessions. In addition to education and firefighting, Kevin is a sought after expert in restorative justice, having facilitated numerous community based cases. A compassionate and charismatic leader, Kevin bravely piloted one of the biggest workplace human rights case in Canada, regarding systemic racism and discrimination within Halifax Fire. Led by the document the Struggle for Acceptance, this action was resolved through a restorative process prompting union, management, and the HABFF to co-operatively accept directives promoting a respectful workplace.


Gale Burford

Nigel Richardson

Nigel is Director of Children’s Services at Leeds City Council, England. Since joining in 2010, he has successfully led the service out of government intervention via a period of significant improvement and transformation, with the result of children and young people in Leeds being placed at the heart of the city’s growth strategy. Prior to joining Leeds, Nigel was the first Director of Children’s Services in Hull, England, where he helped the city pursue its position as the world’s first "Restorative City". Nigel’s career in public service began over 34 years ago working with young offenders. Since then he has held a wide variety of roles across a number of social care and local government settings. He has also held such key leadership roles as Assistant Director of Social Services, and Director of Social and Housing Services. Nigel has advised on national policy and practice developments in England and internationally.


Dr. Kim Stanton Dr. Kim Stanton

Kim Stanton

Dr. Kim Stanton graduated from the University of British Columbia Faculty of Law and practiced litigation at a national law firm in Vancouver after a clerkship at the British Columbia Supreme Court. Prior to law school, she worked at a human rights commission and on a legal team preparing a genocide case before the International Court of Justice. She has worked with the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Gaza Strip and with the Ghana Centre for Democratic Development in Accra, where she was an Official Observer of Ghana's National Reconciliation Commission. In Canada, she established her own law practice, focusing on constitutional and Aboriginal law. Kim completed her Masters of Law on the subject of amnesties, constitutions and truth commissions, and her Doctorate of Juridical Science on the topic of truth commissions and public inquiries in established democracies, both at the University of Toronto, where she is a Senior Fellow of Massey College. Kim was appointed to both the Ontario Health Professions Appeal and Review Board and Health Services Appeal and Review Board in 2012. She is the Legal Director of the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF), a national equality rights organization.


Barry Stuart

Barry Stuart

Barry Stuart, Co-founder & Chair, Smart Justice Network of Canada, former Chief Judge of the Territorial Court of Yukon (now retired), a faculty member of numerous Canadian law schools, and an internationally respected leader in multiparty conflict resolutions – has pioneered the use of peacemaking Circles for public processes in North America over the last twenty years. His professional interests have always centered on decision-making processes, dispute and conflict resolution, and the design and development of consensus-building processes. He has worked as a lawyer, mediator, consensus facilitator, policy analyst to government, chief land claims negotiator, professor, and speaker. In the 1970s, he played a leading role in shaping environment law in Canada.


Saleem Tariq

Saleem Tariq

Saleem Tariq is Chief Officer, Children's Social Work for Leeds City Council. Saleem began his social work career as a residential social worker with looked after children and young people. He has also worked with children with disabilities in a short breaks home and with adults with learning disabilities living in the community. Saleem spent time working in the private sector in London before moving to Leeds in 1992 to undertake the Diploma in Social Work. Having qualified in 1994 he worked as a Social Worker and then a manager at all levels in the service until his appointment to his current post in December 2011.


Senator Vern White

Senator Vern White

Senator Vern White served Canadians for almost 31 years as a police officer, before his appointment to the Senate of Canada. He worked in three provinces and three territories for three different police agencies including serving as Assistant Commissioner of the Royal Mounted Canadian Police and as Chief of Police in both Durham, Ontario and Ottawa. Throughout his career Senator White has been deeply committed and involved in community issues. He has taken a restorative approach to his work in policing and with the community for much of his career.

Mr. White holds a Diploma in Business Administration from the College of Cape Breton, a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology and Psychology from Acadia University, a Masters Degree from Royal Roads University in Conflict Analysis and Management and a Professional Doctorate in Police Leadership from the Charles Sturt University.

Mr. White has been honoured with a number of awards and commendations over the years, including a Commissioners Commendation, a Queen’s Jubilee Medal, and a United Way Community Builder of the Year Award.


Gale Burford

Chief Judge Pamela S. Williams

Chief Judge Williams was appointed a judge of the Provincial and Family Courts of Nova Scotia in September 2003. She has presided over adult and youth criminal proceedings and occasional family court matters. Between October 2006 and August 2010, she was the primary Youth Court Judge in the Metro Youth Justice Court. Since then she has been the dedicated judge for the Nova Scotia Mental Health Court. She also presides in adult criminal court. On April 26th, 2011, she was appointed Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial and Family Court. Nearly two years later, on February 26, 2013, she was appointed Chief Judge of the Provincial and Family Court for the Province of Nova Scotia. Prior to her appointment, she was a staff lawyer with Nova Scotia Legal Aid for nearly 20 years. During that time, she represented adults and youth in the areas of family law and criminal law. She was also a legal advocate for the mentally ill who appeared before the Criminal Code Review Board.


Hosted by

Dalhousie University Dalhousie Faculty of Dentistry • Dalhousie Schulich School of Law • Nova Scotia Dental Association • Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women • Crime Prevention Unit of the Nova Scotia Department of Justice • Nova Scotia Criminal Justice Association • The Restorative Approach International Learning Community

Conference Sponsors

We gratefully acknowledge the generous support of our sponsors: The Donald R. Sobey Foundation • Wagners Law Firm

Dalhousie University Dalhousie University Schulich School of Law Dalhousie University School of Dentistry NS Advisory Council on The Status of Women
Nova Scotia Department of  Justice NS Criminal Justice Association Wagners Law Firm